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15 Note Taking Applications for Linux

December 12th, 2010 Leave a comment Go to comments

Nothing beats the traditional methods of note taking, a simple pen and paper.  Nowadays it’s very common for many of us to use an application such as notepad, Evernote or some other note taking tool to jot down and organize our thoughts and work.

In this article, we’re listing top 15 populate note taking applications for Linux that are simply to the point.

  1. nts – an acronym for Note Taking Simplified. It provides a simple, intuitive format for using plain text files to store notes, a command line interface for viewing notes in a variety of convenient ways, and a cross-platform, wx(python)-based GUI for creating and modifying notes as well as viewing them. Displayed items can be grouped by path or tag and can be filtered in various ways.
  2. MyNotex – software to take and to manage textual notes, even large numbers of them. Notes are gathered under different subjects and consist of a title, a date, a list of tags (keywords), and a free-length text which can be formatted (change font color, name, size, italic, bold, etc.); the software can manage bullets and numbered lists, although without automatic indentation. A single file produced by MyNotex contains multiple subjects and notes.
  3. Nodau – a simple console based note taking program, it allows you to easily create, edit, and view notes, and search them by name or date.
  4. tnote – a small note taking program for the terminal. It aims to be small, quick, and easy to use, and is similar to sticky style GUI note taking apps such as Tomboy notes.
  5. Notalon – a simplified note-taking application. Its aim is to streamline your focus on taking notes on books and during class lectures.
  6. Mediabird – allows students to document and review their study effort using a collaborative notepad. The Web2.0 application allows for taking notes on a personal notepad. A virtual text marker allows the students to highlight their notes and ask questions about the highlighted parts.
  7. Nurpawiki – a personal information manager (PIM) application that combines a wiki, a to-do list, and a simple scheduler to help you get organized. It aims to ease note taking and action planning. Actions (to-dos) are always associated with notes or plans (wiki pages). The application will be extended for multiple users in the future to help organizing small team development.
  8. NoteFinder – an application for managing any text information: notes, quotes, conversations, drafts, articles, contacts, etc.
  9. Tomboy – a desktop note-taking application for Linux and Unix. It is simple and easy to use, but has the potential to help you organize the ideas and information you deal with every day.
  10. Web-NoteTaker – a PHP/MySQL Web-based note taking tool designed for “formal” note taking. It was originally designed to facilitate the author’s note taking process, which required tracking who said what during a meeting and then how what was said “evolved”. The tool allows you to attribute notes to attendees and give notes “types”, and it timestamps the entries. At this point the tool does not allow editing through the UI, but does allow entry of notes through the UI.
  11. gnoteman – a quick and simple note taking applet for the GNOME panel. It has a bare minimum of features, and is primarily used to jot down a quick note for future reference. It can also be used as a “sticky notes” applet.
  12. Tomboy-LaTeX – a plugin for the desktop note-taking application Tomboy. It automatically converts LaTeX math code enclosed in \[…\] into inline images. Clicking on the image and moving the cursor near the image reveals the markup again.
  13. Noty – a small note-taking application. It allows for small notes with formatting that can be organized into a tree-like structure and which also use internal hyperlinks.
  14. The Note-Taking Tool – a note-taking application tailored for use by students in academic environments. It makes use of the well accepted Cornell Note-Taking method.
  15. Thumbpad – a simple note taking program, which displays a very large keyboard that you can easily type on using only one finger. So, if you’re holding your PDA with one hand, you can use your thumb.
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  1. Peter
    December 13th, 2010 at 17:40 | #1

    Zim is a good note taking application also. It works a bit like a wiki. It can be found in the Mint repositories. Simple text files that can contain images and links.

    Best, Peter.

  2. December 14th, 2010 at 00:17 | #3

    My favorite notes taking applications are:

    – CherryTree (syntax highlighting for code snippets)
    – Notecase
    – Zim

  3. Alaric
    December 15th, 2010 at 05:44 | #4

    Notalon looks promising; I like the pdf feature. You could also look into KeepNote, Cherry Tree, and BasKet Note Pads. BasKet is a decent replacement for MS OneNote–its folding feature is excellent. It’s qt/KDE native, but runs well in Gnome and LXDE, so long as you don’t mind a big download of qt dependencies. Its only other downside is it doesn’t support printing yet. None of these are as simplistic as most of those you listed, but if you like working at the terminal vim has good note-taking with an addon called vim-outliner.

  4. December 22nd, 2010 at 17:26 | #5

    […] 15 Note Taking Applications for Linux Nothing beats the traditional methods of note taking, a simple pen and paper. Nowadays it’s very common for many of us to use an application such as notepad, Evernote or some other note taking tool to jot down and organize our thoughts and work. […]

  5. December 25th, 2010 at 18:00 | #6

    Zim is a good note taking application also. It works a bit like a wiki. It can be found in the Mint repositories. Simple text files that can contain images and links. Best, Peter.

  1. December 14th, 2010 at 03:29 | #1
  2. December 15th, 2010 at 00:57 | #2